White sparkle on some materials

vray
#1

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#2

I am experiencing the above problem (the white sparkle) on some of the materials in the render)… What could be the issue.

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#3

Bump or displacement map multiplier might be too much. Can you share some screenshots that shows those materials parameters?


Also are you using GPU acceleration? If so try disabling it and see if it helps.

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#4

Thank you … The materials don’t have bump maps, only reflection layer is present… Attached are two screenshots of parameters associated with the wall cabinets wood material, the material that is mostly affected

!

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#5

The second portion of the same material

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#6

Not sure exactly what’s wrong but i suggest you to create a new material and add that reflection layer manually with default settings. Also check this this official manual for materials (and their defaults/features).

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#7

You were right, it was a material issue… I tried to play around with material parameters and discovered that the issue was the glossiness subdivision in the reflection parameters being too low … I added them to 16, 32, 64 and so on, until I got something somewhat satisfactory… Thanks a lot anyway.

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#8

Glad you sort it out.
Nice render by the way!

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#9

Thanks, too dark though… I don’t know how one can increase brightness without increasing highlight in the overexposed areas. So that one does not have to do much in postprocessing… Or maybe I should start a new thread on that issue… Below was my final image after a lot of gambling here and there in Photoshop.

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#10

It is possible to increase the brightness without burning out the highlights. You just need to even out the lights so you are bringing the darker areas up closer to the highlights. It’s the same as when making a photograph. Post-processing can do a lot but if you’ve already burned out the highlights or the shadows are blocked up, that detail won’t be there. Use the same thought process when setting up the lighting in your renders. The more evenly you light the model, the less post you’ll need to do.

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#11

@Dave R. Thank you. I believe here, you mean, introducing some artificial lighting for the darker areas of the interiors, to work with GI or sky-lighting that already look good in the overexposed areas… right?

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#12

Yes. That’s what I mean. Think about what you would have to do to make it work if you were photographing a real location like your kitchen. Either the highlights need to come down or the shadows need to come up so the values are closer together.

If you have the opportunity, you should read The Negative and The Print, both by Ansel Adams. Although you aren’t using film here, the general thinking should be the same.

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closed #13

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