Sharing my Architectural Work #1

#61

Continuing to learn Enscape. I made the light fixtures from scratch.

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#62

@mattd Here is the text on My rudimentary Door and Window Schedules. I’m going to follow up with some screenshots or short videos and then the room finish schedule. 1126 buist avenue a-2_3 r2.pdf (841.8 KB)
WINDOW SCHEDULE METHOD
STEP 1 INSERT OR CREATE YOUR WINDOW COMPONENTS.
STEP 2 EDIT COMPONENT AND ADD THE ATTRIBUTES YOU WANT. I LIKE TO INCLUDE THE TYPE AND SIZE
ALL IN THE DEFINITION NAME. I DO NOT LIKE TO USE THE AUTOMATED DIMENSIONAL ATTRIBUTES
BECAUSE IF I INCLUDE TRIMS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT IN THE COMPONENT IT REPORTS THE WRONG
DIMENSION. MY SCHEDULES ARE VERY SIMPLE RIGHT NOW ALL I’M REPORTING IS TAG #, TYPE AND SIZE
AND WHETHER OR NOT IT MUST MEET EGRESS REQUIREMENTS.
STEP 3 LABEL THE COMPONENT INSTANCES. I LABEL WITH THE FIRST NUMBER BEING THE FLOOR LEVEL
AND THE SECOND 2 NUMBERS ARE THE ITEM NUMBER. SUCH AS W101 IS WINDOW NUMBER 1 ON THE
FIRST FLOOR. I LIKE TO DO THIS IN THE OUTLINER. I TURN ON JUST ENOUGH CONTEXT SO I CAN TELL
WHERE THE WINDOWS ARE LOCATED. THEN WITH THE OUTLINER AND ENTITY INFO WINDOWS OPEN I
USE THE INSTANCE FIELD TO LABEL THEM.
STEP 4 OPEN THE REPORT GENERATOR. CREATE A NEW TEMPLATE AND ADD ENTITY NAME, DEFINITION
NAME AND ANY OF THE OTHER ATTRIBUTES YOU ADDED. SAVE THE TEMPLATE. MAKE SURE IT’S SET TO
CURRENT SELECTION AND ONE COMPONENT NESTING LEVEL. SELECT ONLY THE WINDOWS AND RUN
THE REPORT. DOWNLOAD THE CVS FILE INTO A DIRECTORY AND NAME IT APPROPRIATLY LIKE FF
WINDOWS.CVS
STEP 5 OPEN THE CVS FILE WITH A SPREADSHEET EDITOR AND RESORT IT BASED ON THE TAG NUMBERS.
SAVE IT.
STEP 6 OPEN LAYOUT. USE THE LABEL TOOL TO ADD THE LABELS TO THE WINDOWS THE LABEL TOOL
WILL REPORT THE TAG YOU ASIGNED IN THE INSTANCE FIELD FOR EACH WINDOW.
STEP 6 IMPORT THE CVS FILE INTO LAYOUT AND TWEAK THE FORMAT OF THE SHEDULE. ONCE YOU DO
IT ONCE YOU CAN JUST USE THE MATCH COMMAND TO FORMAT SCHEDULES IN THE FUTURE.

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#63

As a mac fanatic since the '80s, I was convinced that my machines could to everything a PC could do but, better. Course, my past experience is based on audio and video production with pro soft for music and, at the time, there was NOTHING really (my point of view, being prejudice of course) on a PC that could compete with Final Cut Pro, Logic Pro and other production (QT based) soft for OS.

However, as my SketchUp models got bigger and more complex, I found that the mac began to crawl (a normal thing we all experience(d) with all versions) and take up to 15 to 20 minutes to load. When a mouse move would give me the spinning rainbow ball of death wait, it became apparent that autosave became a deterrent to modelling and soon, every little trick, tool and or purge I could do to make it managable became THE process to complete large projects. Shadows off, profiles off, using Face Style “Shaded” (without textures)… to get to the end of a big build.

But, all of this became irrelevant once I got into rendering. As much of a demand I put on my macs, it was nothing compared to what rendering soft was demanding. Choking, coughing, crashing and multiple restarts and loss of work had become a “habit” I had thought was the norm. Yet, when it came to my first rendering paid job, I absolutely needed to find a solution and succumbed to buying a PC I could use for rendering only. I bought a PC version of SketchUp to accommodate the render soft and soon discovered just how different the mac and PC are/were. First, as a mac only guy, I wasn’t sure how to use the new pc SketchUp as there were some differences with how material (eyedrop) editing worked, extension placement, etc… but, over time, I’ve become reliant on the PC SU version. But, simply, I needed a tank to numbers crunch the render data and the PC was able to handle all that my mac couldn’t.

What’s great about having both, is that now when my PC is rendering (scenes can take up to a day to render at times), I still rely on my mac SU for working on new files that will later be copied of to PC when they get too big for my macs britches (Mac Pro (Early 2008), 2 x 2.8 GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon, 14 GB 667 MHz DDR2 FB-DIMM, NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GT 512 MB). The old mac can’t have the GPU power necessary for handling huge render scenes.

Though I’m faithful to run the rest of my life via the mac, I am SO THANKFUL to have a pc with enough punch to allow for production of large projects that my mac simply can’t chew on, let alone swallow. Having both platforms has made my life MUCH easier.

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