I see rafters through the slates


#1

i see rafters through the slates . is this normal or how do I change it . when I use the rectangle tool or the paint tool here is a picture

thanks bill


#2

Is your slate a flat 2d rectangle? Try using the push pull tool to give it a thickness. Like in real life, everything should have a thickness.
Or your slate is just too thin.


#3

Hi TJ

does the slate not come in a standard 3/8 inch size. i could make a
component but then i cannot push it unless i explode it

bill


#4

Hi TJ

does the slate not come in a standard 3/8 inch size. i could make a component but then i cannot push it unless i explode it

bill


#5

Textures may come with standard length / width, but not thickness. So you should make it thick, easily with the push tool. Even if it’s a group or component, you can double click to enter it to be allowed to modify it.


#6

Hi Billy,

In SketchUp there are only Edges (lines) and Faces (flat surfaces) to build things with.
On your screen, Edges and Faces appear just one pixel thick.
However, in theory and for all practical purposes the Edges and Faces are infinitely thin.

When you apply Materials with the Paint Bucket tool, SketchUp paints an image on the Face.
So what you’re referring to as “Slate” is just a picture of slate, painted on a single infinitely thin Face.
The Edges of the rafters show through the roof because your roof is just a single infinitely thin Face.

Here’s a better way to model what you want.

Model one rafter.
Use the Eraser tool to hide the Edges along the top of the rafter.
Make the rafter a Component.
Use the Move tool to Copy and create a Linear Array of all the rafters needed.

Now draw the roof surface.
Push/Pull the Face to create thickness just like the real-world thickness of the roof.
That is, the thicknesses of the underlying wood structure plus the thickness of the overlapping slates.

Now paint the roof with the slate material image.
Make the roof a Group.

See these video tutorials…
Components


Copy and Arrays


Eraser


#7

Also please be aware that due to limitations of the OpenGL display library used by SketchUp, as you zoom out a thin object may reach the point where it is shown as only one pixel thick on the display. This can cause objects touching the rear of the object to “bleed” through on the display, though the model itself is still ok.