Carving into a sphere


#1

I would like to carve into a sphere. For a school project, I am trying to make a cell nucleus. It has a sphere with some of it carved out and another sphere inside. cell I do not know how to do this, however. I made a sphere, but I cannot find a way to cut into it to do something like this. Would I need to redraw the sphere? Thank you!


#2

the free (online) version doesn’t have solid tools and you cannot load extensions that perform solid functions

this leaves you with the manual method to create the nuclear pores around the exterior; to do this you will need to create a small sphere and copy it around wherever you would like the pores; select the small and large spheres and have the selections interact with each other, then delete the newly cut (and unnecessary) geometry


#3

Does SketchUp Free have the Intersect With functions? That’s what I always use (even though I have SketchUp Pro and its solid tools).


#4

TBH, I’m not sure as I have SU2018Pro, but it would be disappointing if it didn’t


#5

The no-cost SketchUp Make version certainly has the Intersect With functions. The original poster may be able to use them, if they have a computer that can host the downloadable SketchUp Make 2017 application (for Windows or Mac). I think the 2015 and 2016 versions of SketchUp Make are also still available on Trimble’s web site, which can work better on computers with lesser graphics hardware compared to what 2017 and later require.

[I hope I’m not confusing matters by bringing SketchUp Make into the equation; I don’t know much about SketchUp Free, and don’t think I have a Trimble Connect account to experiment with it.]


#6

The other responders are right: Use SketchUp Make to create the model of the nucleus. You’ll have to use the Intersect With command numerous times. For the cutaway, I’d suggest creating a sphere and making it a component. Then create an L-shaped “cutting plane” that will slice through the sphere at the equator and from equator to pole. Once you’ve run the Intersectcommand, delete the quarter-sphere to reveal the innards. For the pores, open the sphere component and go to View>Hidden Geometry. Use the points where dashed lines cross as spots to position small cylinders. With all the cylinders in place, run another Intersect command to create the pores.


#7

Here’s a quicky for making the sphere, the dimples take a little longer.
SplitSphere


#8

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