Help to fix SKP to get a STL


#1

Hello,
Im learning SketchUp. And I can’t solve this problem. I have googled without success.

I made a house with SketchUp and now I want to 3D print it. So I export the STL but it is incomplete (roof is missing). I think the problem is that I did not use solids for the roof.
I am trying everything I can to fix it…

Can someone help me? Thank you in advance.

Here is the file: https://www.dropbox.com/s/d7bdgn5m6x12mpa/house.skp?dl=0

Best regards!


#2

You have reversed faces and holes in your model. Turn the textures off and view your model in monochrome to see the reversed faces:

View Menu > Face Style > Monochrome

With the default style, you want to see the white/grey faces, not the blue ones. Right click on them and choose ‘Reverse Face’. Click on a white one then right-click and choose "Orient Faces’ to flip them all the right way.

A very useful plugin is Solid Inspector2 which helps find holes in a model that stop it counting as a solid. It is free from the extension warehouse.

You also have the 3d printing object at the origin, which you might as well delete.


#3

There are a few other things about your model that you need to address also.
You have lots of internal faces, for example there is a ceiling and many faces dividing the roof space. All of this needs to be removed so you just have one outer skin, even at the doors where you have a step, they shouldn’t have the internal face.
Most importantly you need to understand that 3d printing doesn’t see lines as such, it prints shapes. So all your windows and doors are basically invisible to the printer, it will just see a flat wall and will print it as such. You need to give them some depth. pull the frames out. push the glass in etc
Overhangs such as your eaves and roof over your entryway can be a problem in printing too, so you may want to look at that differently. You could design it so the roof would be printed separately to the rest of the house, giving you a flat base to start the print, but you’d want to raise the porch roof to meet the roofline.
You would get a far more interesting print if you designed the walls with thickness and included the internal walls with thickness and had a separate roof. This would also reduce the amount of print material needed, which can reduce the cost.


#4

Thanks McGordon and Box!

I have followed your advices combine with other things I finally I got the model. Its not perfect, pero pretty good.

Thank you again!


#5

This topic was automatically closed 91 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.