Dimensions - changing the plane


#1

Anybody know how to change the plane on which dimensions show? i.e. currently they extend up in the air like rugby posts, but I’d like them running along the ground like the white lines on the pitch.


#3

You can also rotate dimensions like other entities.
While performing the ‘Rotate’ operation, you can drag the cursor to set the axis of rotation.
Or with the ‘Dimension’ tool (still) active, you can try to manipulate/force the drawn dimension to a new (ground) plane. You may need to orbit to first get a different view of your model.


#4

Much of SketchUp’s tool behavior is view based.
That is, tool orientation is coupled to camera orientation.

Let’s say you want your dimensions to extend horizontally on the ground plane…
Then simply orbit the camera until your view is predominantly looking down along the blue z axis.

See this article:
How do I draw a rectangle or circle (or polygon) oriented vertically? — SketchUp Sage Site


#5

Or go to Window/Model Info/Dimensions and choose:
(.) Align to dimension

instead of the default Align to screen.

You’ll probably also need to go to Expert Dimension Settings, and uncheck
Hide when foreshortened
and
Hide when too small

or else leave them checked, but adjust the sliders to control when to hide them.

Here’s what the result looks like for a rectangle


#6

Your original question is ambiguous as to whether you are referring to the text or the leader lines, but some combination of the techniques proposed above should handle your needs. If not, please clarify further what you mean with an example. Also, please note that the direction of the dimension from the entity depends on how you drag it out when creating it. As noted, it varies with your view direction, but you can typically get at least two directions by dragging carefully.


#7

Apologies for the confusion. Please see attached image.

Some dimension lines are “along the floor” whereas others stick up in the air. Short of deleting and creating again is there a way to rotate them 90 degrees?