Carving out hollow forms and creating shells?

I would like to model a soapbox derby car.
Can anyone suggest a good way to “carve out” the front and back (as to taper them) , then add a skin over the new surface? (My real life material will probably be kerf bent .5" plywood)
Lastly, does anyone know of a plugin that will produce accurate shop drawings, that I can export to DXF (for CNC)?

Thanks!

By “carve out” and “taper them” do you mean to make the top slope down?

With your model as it is, you could draw the shape of what you want to cut off and intersect it with the model. Since it’s symmetrical about its longitudinal axis, you only need to model half of it.

To create the thickness in the skins, you could use Fredo6’s Joint Push/Pull.

Are you really set on using 1/2 in. ply for the skins? That seems excessive and kerfing it will be a lot of work. You’ll also have to fill the kerfs with something which will add more weight and work. How about using 4 or 6mm ply over a frame? It won’t need any kerfing. When it is bent into shape it will be extremely strong. If you really think you need the weight, you could bend a second layer over the first like sometimes do in boat construction.

For CNC work there are some different options. I would look at extensions like the old Flattery to make flat copies of your curved surfaces. Then probably look at the software offerings from Vectric. They can import the SketchUp model and output the code for the CNC machine.

DaveR

      SketchUp Sage




    May 2

By “carve out” and “taper them” do you mean to make the top slope down?

With your model as it is, you could draw the shape of what you want to cut off and intersect it with the model. Since it’s symmetrical about its longitudinal axis, you only need to model half of it.

To create the thickness in the skins, you could use Fredo6’s Joint Push/Pull.

Are you really set on using 1/2 in. ply for the skins? That seems excessive and kerfing it will be a lot of work. You’ll also have to fill the kerfs with something which will add more weight and work. How about using 4 or 6mm ply over a frame? It won’t need any kerfing. When it is bent into shape it will be extremely strong. If you really think you need the weight, you could bend a second layer over the first like sometimes do in boat construction.

For CNC work there are some different options. I would look at extensions like the old Flattery to make flat copies of your curved surfaces. Then probably look at the software offerings from Vectric. They can import the SketchUp model and output the code for the CNC machine.


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Many thanks Dave,
I know this is the strategy I should use, but need tips on the exact method, which I’ll research per your suggestion…

Thanks for the DXF prep suggestion also.