Vector art cleanup in Sketchup


#1

I am using Sketchup to illustrate signage; including logo elements, lettering, etc. Any suggestions on how to get vector art logos to import into Sketchup with little to no clean up?


#2

Hi Michele,

See @chamberz tutorial for ideas.


#3

Michele,

I think your question may be slightly ambiguous. It appears that Geo interpreted your request for “suggestions on how to get vector art logos to import into Sketchup with little to no clean up,” as asking how to come up with the vectors in the first place–how to convert raster images into vectors. It sounds to me like you’ve already got the vector logos and just want to “get them into SketchUp” reasonably intact.

It’s a problem controlling the conversion of curves made in a 2D drawing program to the kind of straight-line, segmented curves used in SU; in my experience coming from CorelDraw via dxf, it isn’t as simple as one segment per node: sometimes curves come across chunky and oversimplified, and sometimes they seem to have a thousand little bitty segments, sometimes broken into separate entities and sometimes with gaps or bad intersections.

I have grown increasingly confident in my ability to trace intricate curves using SU’s limited drawing tools–primarily the Line and Arc tools–and you can exercise far greater control over segmentation. Additionally, there are various plugins to help with tracing curves and controlling their segment spacing. Perhaps you should consider importing the logos as traceable images and tracing them by hand in SU. You certainly have the greatest control over the outcome that way.

Incidentally, may I inquire why you elected to produce your 2D signage with a 3D modeling program?

-Gully


Tracing an outline
#4

Gully, thanks for your insight. This is EXACTLY what i was asking… we have been using CorelDraw for most of our design and shop drawings, but giving the client a 3D model of their proposed sign - speaks volumes and helps them visualize exactly what we have in mind as far as building it, scale, etc… sometimes it’s the 3D model and renderings that sell the job.

Today, I actually did do exactly as you have recommend and brought in the vector logo as a DWG from Corel and locked it, and then traced it using Sketchup. It just makes the project take that much longer… was hoping for a quicker way.

But thanks for your help!!!


#5

The old trick to control arc and curve segmentation in imported line art from Corel Draw or Illustrator is to prepare the file in the illustration application prior to exporting to DWG or DXF. Add nodes to the arcs and curves until they look right and then straighten the segments and export. In most cases there is no need to retrace everything in SketchUp.

Anssi


#6

is there a “how to” on proper prep you mention? I have illustrator and my first vector to dwg was fine but my second vector to dwg imported to SU badly. ( and yet is a simpler design)


#7

Here’s an Illustrator technique that might help:

https://helpx.adobe.com/illustrator/how-to/join-trim-paths-lines.html


#8

An old forum thread on importing AI to SU https://sites.google.com/site/sketchupsage/tips-tricks/work-other-programs/illustrator-to-sketchup.


#9

thanks. Colin solved my issue by telling me how to simply add anchors in illustrator. It made my dwg import perfectly.