SketchUp and macOS Mojave (10.14)

macos
mojave

#104

I upgraded / updated both SU and Mojave and so far no problems encountered after about 8 hours working time in both SU and Layout. My iMac is a 2017 model.

Thanks,

Steven Walsh

STEVEN WALSH ARCHITECT

swalsh@me.com

303.579.6365

915 15th Street

Boulder, CO 80302


#105

John is right that I’m not having problems with SketchUp 18.1.1180 under Mojave 10.14.2.

However, I can’t say that installation of Mojave itself was without issues. For impatient readers, I’ll cut to the chase: I think Mojave is more sensitive than past macOS installations to detritus left behind by previous macOS versions. A disk wipe and clean install may be the only way to get it working on some computers.

Now the details of my specific case. When I first attempted to install Mojave, the process took a very long time - like 4-5 hours, not the 35-40 minutes Apple says is normal. When I fired up the computer at the end of the install, everything was glacially slow. Simply typing my password to log in required 15-20 seconds before each character responded! Opening Finder took several minutes! The system proclaimed it couldn’t connect to my WiFi because there was no adapter hardware detected. Fortunately, I keep good backups, including an externally bootable carbon copy, and I was able to restore High Sierra without difficulty.

A bit later, I took the Mac to the Apple store for a battery replacement (it is a 6-year old MacBook Pro with a lot of charge cycles on it). They had a local copy of the installer and agreed to try it for me. The installation itself went faster, but with the same end result. The “Genius” there had no clue of what was wrong. His only suggestion was to erase the disk and do a clean install, which I rejected because I really can’t go without the computer for the two or three days it would probably take me to re-install all my apps and data, including licenses.

Then I went online and searched for reports of similar issues. Lo and behold, I found hundreds of people reporting exactly the symptoms I was getting. And one person had tracked it to an obscure system configuration file that evidently Mojave doesn’t erase or overwrite during installation. The advice was to delete that file, as it is a tweak not an essential anyway and then retry the installation. I did so and presto! Mojave went in cleanly and has been fine ever since! And here’s the really strange part: shortly afterward, Apple deleted the discussion topic where I saw that advice from its forum! No explanation, just poof!


#106

The same applies to Windows, About every year to year and a half I wipe the storage and start over. When removing apps, the installers leave all sorts of ■■■■ behind. Being in the preview program I have even found MS had the same issue, not being able to remove all of their trash.


#107

A disk wipe and clean install is the solution of last resort on all systems, as both the OS and apps can stick things in strange places on the disk without telling you or leaving any record of what they did. Various vendors have made a bunch of money writing utilities that at least claim to track down all the junk and erase it too when you delete the app, but in my experience they aren’t 100% reliable.

In my specific case I was lucky that it was a single system file causing the issues, and deleting it was safe as it was just a tweak overriding defaults anyway. To this day I have no clue when or why that file was created, nor why it was fine with the previous versions of macOS I have installed.


#108

Steve, do you remember what that file was and where I could find it, if that’s my problem too?

My system is still suffering random freezes and all the other problems I noted earlier, and short of a complete wipe and reinstall, I can’t see how to fix it. I have many scores of installed apps and REALLY don’t want to have to reinstall them all individually.

I do have a current Time Machine backup, but have never had to do a wholesale restore, just occasional individual files.

But I can’t go on much longer with all the issues I’m still having.


#109

@slbaumgartner shared it with me: /etc/sysctl.conf I don’t have that file on either my High Sierra or Mojave machines. I’m going to do some more checking on this. The thread was here: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/8588307

And kudos to @slbaumgartner for finding this.


#110

For those who might care, the /etc/sysctl.conf file is read by the macOS kernel as it enters multi-user mode and causes the kernel to override default parameter values. As you might guess from that description, a) this file isn’t needed or present on a standard installation, and b) editing it can destabilize the OS and is beyond the pay grade of all but expert macOS tinkerers. As mentioned in the post @Barry linked, the only safe action is to delete or rename it if present, as that will just cause the kernel to use defaults. I have no clue what might have created it to tweak my MacBook Pro during the 6 years I have owned it or why it didn’t disrupt previous versions of macOS.


#111

Alas, I don’t have that file at all, so it isn’t there to be causing my problems.

What else, I ask as a rhetorical question not really expecting an answer, is there for me to try before biting the bullet and going for a clean install of either High Sierra or Mojave, then a tedious rebuild of the system from the ground up?