Strange Lines Appearing in Texture of Component

I am getting strange yellow lines in this component of a chair I got from 3DW. There are more than show in the image as they appear and reappear when I move around the model. You can see one of the lines on the inside wing of the chair. They appear where two surfaces are butted together. I have tried hiding the border lines of the adjacent surfaces to no avail.

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We can only guess at what we see in an image.
Kindly post the URL of the 3DWH page.

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Looks like an internal face bleeding through.

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I agree with @eneroth3. The back face color is bleeding through. I’ve induced that here.

It’s even worse with edges hidden because there’s nothing to mask the back face color.

I find that setting the back face color to something dark tends to make it not so apparent.

I agree with @eneroth3. The back face color is bleeding through. I’ve induced that here.

I thought of that so I changed the back color to the same as the front—lines still there.

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Here is the component in 3DWH-
https://app.sketchup.com/viewer/3dw?WarehouseModelId=5e763310-a863-4b39-8cf4-e726aa130d35

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Thanks, I posted it below. (or above)

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Internal faces that you don’t need. The color bleeds through because the fabric color is so dark.
Depending on what you want to do with the model, you may want to fix the reversed (blue default) faces as well.

Thanks everybody for pitching in with possible answers. I did paint the reverse face with black but that did not solve the problem. I did hide all the lines on the faces, that did not help.

SOLUTION: I finally solved it by looking inside the chair arm and found there were faces perpendicular to the upholstery face that were attached. I deleted those faces and voila! No more lines.

As peter said.

That’ll learn me to assume you had already cleaned up the model to eliminate internal faces.

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Come to think of it, is there a plug-in that would perform that function? That is, find unneeded internal faces.

You could try using Solid Inspector or Solid Solver. Best practice is to avoid creating them in the first place or clean as you go.

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In a case like this one, there were few faces and they are easy to spot by x-ray mode.

Quite right. However, in this case, they were buried in a 3dwh component that I downloaded into my model.

Another best practice thing: Don’t download components from the 3DWH directly into your model. Instead, open them in a separate SketchUp session. Take a few minutes to make sure the component will be usable for your needs. Clean up as needed, then copy it and paste it into your model. This prevents you from adding unwanted stuff to your model.

Brilliant!