How to fill a hole left by a subtract, on a complex surface


#1

I have a void to fill and I’m sure there is an easy way to do it, I just can’t find it.

I have created a conical solid and subtracted a cylinder through it, leaving a lovely neat hole, with quite complex entry and exit surface dimensions (cones are like that). I would now like to fill that hole. Is there an easy way to do it?

thanks in advance.


Healing holes with non-planar edges
Sketchup and 3d printing?
#2

Do you mean the cylinder goes (should go) right through the conical shape?

Do you have SketchUp Pro with all its ‘Solid’ tools avaiable In that case subtracting two solids should do the job. Otherwise you could use ‘Intersect Fases with Selection’ with all geometry in the same context (say in one and the same group).

If you are in doubt, please upload what you have got so far.

p.s. if the result of one of the chosen operations above creates edges of say 1mm or less, SketchUp will fail creating faces at these locations!


#3

The cylindrical hole goes right through the cone (horizontally). And I want to get rid of the hole.

yes, I have Pro. Not sure how to use the intersect with faces. But you have given me an idea. If I create a solid cube (or whatever) and subtract on from the other, I may be left with the bits I need to reinsert into the original form.

I would have thought there was an easier way though.

Thanks for you help.


#4

Turn on Hidden Geometry (View > Hidden Geometry), a toggle. Then you’ll see that the cone is made of linear elements, which you can replace.

-Gully


#5

Turn on hidden geometry so you can see the edges that make the faces. Use the pencil to join the correct dots across the hole to reform the missing faces. Then smooth the lines to finish. Too slow typing on my phone.


#6

You shouldn’t do too much of that @Box, you’ll injure your thumbs.


#7

And here I thought that you needed the inside (cylindrical) lining that was missing inside the cone like in Gully’s first cone. But no, you seem to need the original cone again. Remember that all geometry in SketchUp is made up of “just” edges and faces. Some edges may be hidden and/or smooth but they are still there. Turning on ‘Hidden Geometry’ makes them visible to work on. I think [X] is the default shortcut key to toggle display ‘Hidden Geometry’


#8

Thanks all,

The line joining worked a treat.


#10

Thanks @box. I simplified the question for the forum, and the solid was significantly more complex than a cone and a cylinder. Punching the hole wasn’t the problem, but after having printed it, and found it was a “little” too high, filling the hole and putting it lower was the issue, since the whole thing had been unified and I couldn’t just move the anti-cylinder down. But the forum helped, and the join-the-dots fixed the problem.
I suspect there is a nice neat solution if I took the time to understand the components and groups a little better.