Bee hive stand

#1

Any bee keeper around? I don’t have bees yet, but I’m preparing some parts already. I’ve designed a hive stand but I’m not sure whether I have overlooked important characteristics. Any ideas?

hive_stand_2.skp (784.1 KB)

And an image of the first prototype

4 Likes
#2

Awesome! Maybe ant-proofing? From what I’ve read online, it’s something like putting oil (or tanglefoot) in a can around each leg to make an insect barrier.

1 Like
#3

Another version following the example of this video, no big screws for the hight adjustment needed and therefore maybe a bit cheaper than the first version (?) , but less possible height variation…

2 Likes
#4

I’ve asked some beekeepers around and ants don’t seem to be a problem here…

1 Like
#5

Very nice. Would the frame sit on the legs using only friction or would you somehow attach the legs to the frame once it is leveled? I would expect that once it is leveled, no further adjustment would be needed unless it gets moved.

#6

Yes, only friction, in the video, the beekeeper ist standing on top of the stand without any problem. I will build a prototype and test it…

#7

Oops! I missed the video link. That clarifies it.

Looks like it works very well. I don’t know that I’d keep bees but I’ll remember that method of setting up a frame to be level on an uneven surface. In fact it gives me an idea for a new thing my son and I are designing for his scout troop.

1 Like
#8

Another advantage would be the needed storage space…

2 Likes
#9

A small modification (only one push pull :wink: ) to get a place to put a frame while inspecting the hive…

3 Likes
#10

First prototype of the second one…
It’s very stable, I can stand on it :wink:

6 Likes
#11

isitarenderisitarenderisitarenderisitarenderisitarenderisitarenderisitarenderisitarender?

#12

Nononono, not this time :wink:

1 Like
#13

I have bees and made a basic stand which worked well until the ground softened and the legs started to dig into the ground and cause stress on the leg to frame joint, a brace has now been added without fixings to the stand to stop this, there are hives already on the stand so its a bit tricky to work with.
My recommendation if the stand is going straight onto the ground is to have nice wide feet

PS: the hive stand needs to be slightly lower at the front so rain doesnt wash into the hives

1 Like
#14

Great suggestions, thank you!

Next step ahead…

1 Like
#15

Looking forward to the build

#16

Above is the stand I made and as I said, although it seemed nice and strong I didn’t allow for changes in the ground surface, it would have been fine sitting on a concrete slab

This stand was brought here from the beekeeper himself, all of his stands are just like this one
so Im sure your build will be trouble free

2 Likes
#17

Approximately 500 screws and a day later… the first boxes…

8 Likes
#18

you’ve been a busy bee…

john

1 Like
#19

In terms of puns, maybe Box should have replied.

2 Likes
#20

Nobody’s asked if a buzz saw were used at any stage yet…

1 Like