Wine Barrel Segment 1

Thanks. I missed it as I’m A Mac user and was watching it on my phone. All clear now.

Hi Box

I did it. That step by step presentation you did was excellent. Many thanks for your help. I hope to reach your level soon and also be of some help to somebody. Very inspired by your kindness.

Thanks
Hobbiest

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Hi Box.

Here is my drawing done. Got the measurements now I can go and make it. It is a gift for a friends birthday.
Thanks again.

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Good job.

Looks like you still could unsoften edges.

What keeps the heads from falling into the barrel?

Tried to soften the edges but nothing happened. As for the heads in the barrel. I suppose it is the size of the barrel. lol. Keeping the barrel full maybe !! So what is it lol?

If it was a serious question the top and bottom of the barrel is closed.

I guess that’s why “cooperage” is a craft and a profession and not just some guys knocking barrels together.

It was a serious question. the heads (ends) of the barrel would normally fit into crozes, grooves cut across the staves near the ends. You show notches that would keep the heads from falling out but wouldn’t retain them.

I would also review the proportions between diameter of the head and length and curvature of the staves, to match them a bit closer to traditional barrels. I’d maybe increase the head diameter and maybe decrease the stave curvature a bit.

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Many are named after their trade over here, too.
‘Kuiper’= ‘Cooper’

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Hi Dave.

I see what you mean. I was just going to glue them in but you way is much better carpentry work. I will use your method.

Thanks again.
Hobbiest

Hi Aerilius

I also felt the proportions were a bit out so I actually did as you suggested. You guys have been very helpful. The response on this platform is amazing.

Thanks

Hobbiest

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Hi Jack

Those are nice barrels. Really old. Gives things a nice historic feeling. I am going to use rope for the rings on my barrel. The reason for that is I will cut the barrel between the ropes and put a hinge on so the barrel opens there to put the bag of wine into the barrel. Once done I will post a picture. It will take a while because I can only do it on weekends.

Thanks
Hobbiest

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Sounds good!

The staves or ‘Duigen’ as it is called overhere are actually straight when being made, marked and then put together in the hoops. The best wood would be oak.


While a ‘carpenters eye’ might be sufficient for building a house, the ‘coopers’ eyes needed to be much more accurate and they also would need a strict plan by marking all staves otherwise, his plan would fall apart (‘het plan viel in duigen’, the saying goes)

Planer:

Rounding of the bottom or top:

The nodges where also milled when the staves are being held together by ropes:


Feel free to pay a visit when things get a little more easier:


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Hi.

That was very informative. Quite like the history behind the barrels.

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