"English" product names

Finnish companies are eager to invent “international” names for their products. I wish I hadn’t stumbled on the ad for this one:
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Does one of the words have a rude or humorous meaning in Finnish or Swedish?

As a native English speaker with some knowledge of half a dozen other European languages, none of them have any non-obvious meanings for me.

Jalapeño is a Mexican or Spanish word meaning a type of chilli.

Is Poppamies a product line or manufacturer’s brand name? Not a word with any obvious meaning otherwise.

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I know the word relates to cheese, but the other meanings, I think, sort of kill it:
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Like “gay”…

I see. Just “cheese” instead of “cheesy” would be better.

Based on the large variety of “cheese & jalapeno” snacks that I see in stores here in the US, I’d definitely say it’s “cliche” at this point :sweat_smile:

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There are restrictions as to when a product can use the word “cheese”, having to do with the cheese content. That’s why in the US we get products like Kraft Singles which is a “processed cheese product.”

True, it can convey that meaning. When it’s referring to food, you generally understand it to mean actual cheese.

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As a UK native, I wouldn’t have much of a problem with the word cheesy in this context. Sure, it can mean something else entirely in a different context but I am not actually sure what a “cheesy” snack would look like with the wrong connotation. Now if the packet had shown an awful rendition of a Mexican, complete with sombrero and donkey…

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And a guitar…They spared me from that.

If the pack was labelled Mega Cheesy Pussi there might be some issues.

You’re straying into Gloop territory now, surely?

I tried to find a film clip I once saw but couldn’t locate it. A Mexican film with a dancing donkey carrying a mariachi singer with his guitar, serenading a sleeping beauty. I loved it.

Double cheese with cheesy topping!

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