Countersinking an existing hole, or subdivide the hole ,any videos ..sorry still learning

How to countersinking an existing hole, or subdivide the hole ,any videos …sorry still learning .

How you do it depends on the hole, it best to show us an image to get a more correct answer.
One simple way is to use the scale tool.
First use ctrl+move to copy an edge down the hole then ctrl+scale on the top edge to enlarge it around it’s own center.

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Instead of using the Scale tool to resize the circle, with nothing selected, try hovering the Move tool over a circle cardinal point then click and tug.

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Cardinal points are good, but can be hard to find for beginners and aren’t there if the circle isn’t intact.

Thank You ,Thank You, Thank You!!! :smile:

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The Offset tool can be used too. Then use the Move tool to move the inner circle down.

willettfx. - What is that?


Eye mech animatronic for print , had designed 6 month ago . The holes othe are standoffs inserts .the countersink hole needed help with is the inner eyelid hinge mech .
The lid will made to hug the eye later.

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Once again thanks for everybody help

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Post back for final result? :smiley:

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This reminds me of the Kit•Kat Clocks of old.

One I made years back

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but how do you know when you’re scaling that hole, that it is the diameter you want it to be? and the offset that it creates is the depth you want?

By typing the relevant distances while using the tools.
This video should help.

A problem with the scale technique is that a counter sink hole for a screw isn’t an arbitrary angle. There are several common counter sink angles one being 82 degrees at least for US flat-head screws. Maybe there is a scale factor for any circle that gives you 82 degrees? I have not tried to figure it but it seems plausible. Although in after-thought it would depend on the depth also.

The method I showed Matt involved using Offset from the edge of the hole to define the diameter of the countersink. Fortunately for Matt, he’s using metric screws with 90° heads. Moving (Autofold) the rim of the hole down the same distance as the offset dimension yields the correct countersink angle. It is a little harder for the 82° countersink. Maybe another reason to go metric. :smiley:

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For an 82 degree countersink, the depth/diameter is tan(49) = 1.15 (approx).

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That certainly makes things easy.